Good-bye and Hello

I tend to want to make friends with all around me, including pretty much every inanimate object in my everyday life. Especially the objects I live with. So when our stove, after 13 years, was no longer able to do the job, I wish there had been a retirement option, where it could have had a nice rest somewhere after all these years of baking and boiling and so on. But that’s not how it works. I need an oven that heats up, and a stove of this age is not worth fixing. The fact that most of it works still doesn’t keep it in service.

old-stove-9-16-small

So we bought a new stove. The old one left first. I felt sad, thinking about how much time I had spent with this stove. And I remember when we bought it, brand-new. It was the first stove I had ever chosen and made no compromises about. The glass cooktop, the nice black color, the simple controls (I didn’t want many options) – all just right.

The deliveryman for the new stove was amused as he disconnected the old one. I guess most people don’t show sadness at the departure of an appliance.

The new one came in, showing no shyness. It slid right into the space where the old one had been. Even looks pretty much exactly the same. Well, that’s a good thing.

new-stove-small

I don’t know why I feel a bit upset about this change. Maybe it’s because I still thought of the old stove as brand new, as just having moved in with us a little while ago. I remember my pleasure when I first started cooking on it – it suited me perfectly. I felt I’d done a little something about ordering my world, cooking on this stove. Where did the 13 years go so quickly?

Maybe that’s it.

Well, hello, new stove, I am sure we’ll get along fine and learn each other’s ways very soon. Good-bye, old stove, and thank you.

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About Claudia McGill

A person who does art and writes poetry. That's me!

5 responses to “Good-bye and Hello

  1. Yes. Hello, new Claudia’s stove. You are one lucky stove.

  2. I get it. These things may be just things but they are also tangible connections to past times and memories so become the repositories for nostalgia. When we were emigrating and shedding something like 80% of our possessions, it took me aback to discover the things I attached sentimental value to. I felt much the same way about my fireplace and surround as you are about your stove. Hopefully you’ll make great memories (and food) with your new stove and that will be healing.

    • I feel a little stupid, it’s just a stove, but it has a distinct history (as opposed to just being here when we moved in) and now–done. An ending.

      • Yup. That’s how I felt about my fireplace. We had our last house in Scotland built for us so I had designed the fireplace. Leaving it behind was a wrench because of all the memories connected to it and how personal it was to me.

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