Bur Oak Update

The bur oak saga continues. Look here for our initial meeting…

I put the acorns into a bucket of water for 24 hours, as advised by some research my husband did on the internet about planting them.

The idea is that the ones that sink to the bottom, well, they are eligible for planting. The ones that are floating after 24 hours, sadly, will not germinate.

After the time was up, four of the acorns were sinkers. OK, on to round 2!

Once again, guided by the internet, we put them into a plastic bag with some dirt, and stored them in the refrigerator until we can plant them. Maybe in the next day or so. My husband said he will get a few deep pots for them – apparently these little guys put out a tap root that requires room. No shallow yogurt containers will do.

Here is the refrigerator scene. We will see what happens next…

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Bur Oak

On Sunday morning, September 24, my husband and I took a walk in Norristown Farm Park. I’ve written a lot about this park, especially recently. We are exploring here, though we have been acquainted with the location for some years.

If you are interested in some information about this fascinating site, the former farm attached to Norristown State Mental Hospital, look here for a start.

Anyway, today we were walking. Near the former dairy barn and milk processing area, now the park offices we came upon a snowstorm of these odd items scattered on the ground underneath a tree.

They were just littered thick under our feet. I picked one up. I peered at it. An acorn. Yes, it was.

Here they are in the tree.

There was a little info plaque nearby. We learned that this tree is a bur oak (or burr, sometimes spelled). This particular tree has a historic ancestor tree. The plaque tells you all about it.

Well, we picked up some acorns with the idea that we could come home and see if we could get any seedlings to grow. Now, we’ve tried this before with acorns from a chestnut oak. We were doing well there, too, until we got overconfident and underestimated local hungry squirrels. This time we will be smarter and will protect the acorns until any seedlings are BIG.

But I am getting ahead of myself. We brought the acorns home and now we are researching how best to get them situated. It seems we need to soak these acorns for 24 hours; any ones that are floating after that point are not going to germinate. So we’ll try that and see if we brought home any possibilities. If not, well, we can always go back for more, as long as we do it pretty soon.

I took some pictures of the acorns. I am entranced by their shaggy beards, their overlapping scales, and their ghostly look. See what you think.

In Which We Visit Norris City Cemetery

On Sunday, September 10, my husband and I ran/walked at Norristown Farm Park. In our continuing exploration of the park and its environs, after we finished we drove over to the Norris City Cemetery, adjacent to the park.

I’ll mention that it is so adjacent that in an earlier run, I got lost (as I do so often and so easily and with so little ability to stop myself) and did a loop through the cemetery while I got myself back on track.

I’ll also say that once I run a route, I don’t get lost again. I did like the detour through this peaceful spot and I’ll do it again, on purpose.


All right, back to the topic. The cemetery is located on a hill next to an East Norriton township park. The township now owns the cemetery and maintains it (beautifully, I might add). We parked at the back of the cemetery next to the bocce courts and went in the rear entrance.

The cemetery was founded about 160 years ago. It was non-sectarian and seems to have been most used during the period 1880’s to about 1920.  It’s not filled up and I gather you could still be buried here, if you wanted.

(For all information on the history of the site I refer you to the cemetery’s really thorough website, which is where I got my information, Norris City Cemetery . There are also some great then-and-now photos of the cemetery. Thank you to the creators of this site.)

It’s a simple, open site. It flows down a hill, with plenty of room between the rows. We wandered down the hill.

There are not a lot of elaborate monuments here; this was the biggest one we saw.

Most of the monuments are marble or granite. As I’ve seen in other cemeteries, time has not been kind to the marble ones in particular. This stone was representative. To figure out the inscription you might be better with a rubbing rather than trying to decipher it.

But there is plenty to see, all the same. I’ll show you a few things that caught our eyes.

We noticed a bluish monument and took a closer look. I thought it might have been painted. But no; when I tapped it, it rang metal.

We didn’t know what to make of it at the time. We could tell it was hollow. Did that mean it was a container as well as a marker? My husband did some research when we got home and we learned that this monument was an example of a white bronze marker. (All information I mention on this subject is from A Grave Interest, “White Bronze – A Monument of Quality” – take a look, it’s fascinating.)

Long and short of it, the monument is hollow, does not contain anything, and is actually zinc. These markers were manufactured for only a short time around the turn of the last century and were a cheaper alternative to stone markers. Each one was custom made and therefore quite personal. Here is more of the Steiner monument:

Once we knew what to look for, we saw some more. This one:

This one, with a detail of the kind of information you could have included on your monument – the plates you chose were screwed into the structure:

And this one, which is big and elaborate:

All of these markers were in great shape. Apparently the manufacturer claimed these monuments would stand the test of time better than stone. From what I saw here, I would agree.


 

We saw some examples of cemetery symbolism: Lilies, for the resurrection of the soul:

And what looked like a dollar sign with too many vertical lines. (A dollar sign? A dollar sign? I thought.) Later research revealed it to be the IHS monogram (first three letters in Jesus’ name, in Greek.)

I’m glad this was cleared up, but not before I had some thoughts on “you can’t take it with you but maybe I’ll try…” I’m sorry, those thoughts just came into my mind and I couldn’t help it.

I had this thought about the life of Emma Louse Supplee – she lived one-half of her life on one side of 1900 and the other half on the other side. I liked that symmetry. I will need to live until 2042 to achieve the same.

We made our way down the hill. As we did, we noticed something I really liked: the view of the cornfield along one side of the cemetery. It’s part of the Farm Park.

We also saw remnants of stone piled along a section of the perimeter, in the brush. We knew that the cemetery had been derelict before the township took it over about 30 years ago. We figured these were broken/destroyed stones of various purposes and beyond saving. I say this because it is obvious that a lot of care was taken to rehabilitate all that could be, given the present look of the site.

Everything is transient, it says to me.

Here is a view from the bottom of the hill, near the front entrance of the cemetery.

I am glad we stopped and took the time to look around. There is a nice feeling to this location. The township park next door, with all the people and activity of today. The fields with their yearly cycle of growth and death and rebirth. The sky and the trees. The little American flags set on veterans’ graves. The care that today’s living are still taking for those gone long ago and to whom they have no connection other than living in the same city, decades and centuries apart.

Being remembered. It’s nice to think about.

 

If You Live Across the Street from the High School You Are Never Bored

We live across the street from our high school. Great place to be. I have the girls’ lacrosse/field hockey and softball fields right there and I attend a lot of games, despite not knowing much about any of them.

We can also watch the marching band practice, walk on the track, go to swim meets…art fairs…and it goes on and on.

The latest event, to mark the start of school, was a festival of food trucks held in front of the school, yesterday afternoon and evening. Food trucks are a common sight in the city – lots and lots of people eat lunch from one every work day, and you can get about anything. Nowadays they go around to festivals and the like, as well.

From our house, here was the view:

We walked over and paid our (minimal) admission fee. There was food, food, music, food, food, silent auction, picnicking, food, kids running around, food, people waiting in line for food, food…

It’s fun to live in a place like the one where I live!

Revisiting Sunshine in the Sunshine

In the winter of 2014-2015, December 21 to March 21, I did something called the Sunshine Project. It was designed to get me through winter. I’d had some rough times over the previous year and I particularly dreaded winter and cold and darkness, so I fought back with the help of the Sunshine Project.

Anyway, one place I went to during the project was Bryn Athyn College, checking out their garden. Yes, I know, maybe it wasn’t garden weather on January 20, 2015, but I was there.

Well, on Labor Day, September 4, 2017, my husband and I visited the same location. We had passed by the college a couple of days earlier and the gardens were front and center beautiful – you can see them from the road.

There are two gardens and they are maintained by a lot of different people at the college and – they also run a farmers’ market. Let me stop talking and start showing you.

It was a hot, sunny, beautiful day. We started at the garden nearest the college buildings.

All kinds of vegetables. How about those tomatoes?

There are fig trees outside the fence.

There are beehives!

The bees had collected on these purple flowers, almost pushing and shoving each other to get to them. I did get that feeling from the scene, the pushing and shoving, I really did. Summer is ending and there is limited time left before winter takes these flowers. The bees know.

I also took some time with sunflowers. I LOVE sunflowers and these seemed especially friendly to me. Look at how they incline their heads to me, just a little, as if they want to hear what I have to say!

We walked a little distance away. This lovely oak knows that the season is changing, too. It was covered in acorns.

Now, we walked over to a building that had so intrigued me in wintertime. It’s an ice rink. I hadn’t known it was there when I came to the college in 2015. But it was certainly season-appropriate for January.

I wondered what we would find today. Well, here it is.

An indoor practice field!

We walked on to the second garden.

Similar plants to those in the first garden were being grown in this plot. But what was different was that there are chickens living here! We walked around to the gate near their coop. The whole group of hens rushed up to us. A scurry of hens!

I think they thought we might have some food for them.

Then, as we watched, the rooster hurried out of the coop. It was obvious that he thought he was missing something and that he needed to get back in charge of things.

Well, the hens realized we had nothing for them and they drifted off. The rooster stuck around a little longer.

I got a closer picture of this guy. He is some kind of fancy.

In fact, all the hens were beautiful to look at, too. I think the gardeners are raising several kinds of heirloom or special chickens. I loved the variety of feather patterns and body and tail shapes.

All right. We had seen the gardens and enjoyed them thoroughly. I reflected upon how the Sunshine Project is still affecting my life, almost three years later. I feel I have completed a small circle with this visit, coming here in winter and summer, seeing the same place but in a different mood. Both of us!

Let’s Get Better Acquainted

I’ve mentioned Norristown Farm Park several times in the past. It’s a county park not too far from my house; I’ve done several orienteering events there, including the Montco Senior Games in 2016 and 2017 and in July, I ran a 5K on its grounds.

But I never spent much time there otherwise. I found the network of roads and trails confusing and I had no idea how to map out a run that would get me back to where I started. Then…my husband changed his office to a nearby location after his accident in December, 2016. He started exploring local parks, the Farm Park being one of them. And guess what: A Boy Scout Eagle Project has resulted in a 5K course all laid out nice and neatly.

Suddenly a trip to the park was necessary, so that I could try this route out.

A bit of history. This park is the former farm attached to the adjacent Norristown State Mental Hospital. In the early days of the hospital (founded in the 1880’s) this land was a working farm that provided food for the patients as well as occupation. It was thought that healthy outdoor work of this type would be beneficial to their recoveries. The farm included crop-growing fields, dairy cows, a dairy, stables, and even a fish hatchery (still in existence).

If you want to know more about Norristown State Hospital, which is now in the end stages of winding down (all that will be left is the forensic unit, meaning people who are in the hospital as part of the judicial/correction systems), you can see my experience in an orienteering event I did this summer on the grounds of the hospital. I will say that every time I go into the park I remember the people who have walked over and worked this land in the past; there is a history that needs to be respected, I feel.

Anyway, today, though, the idea was to try out this route. It’s different from the one I did in the competition in July and covers a lot of the same ground I did in the Senior Games events. The start is at the same place, the pavilion area. I was amazed at how different things look with 8-foot tall corn in the fields:

September, 2017

Here are a couple of places in the park –  the same locations at different times of the year. Things change.

My husband and I parked in the pavilion parking lot and set out. We planned to walk the 5K route. Corn all around us.

There are still signs left from when the park was a farm. There are many buildings, bridges, and other structures scattered over the acres.

 

Our route took us over a freight line crossing through the park.

As I said, there are a lot of buildings on the property, many of them falling into ruin, though some are being restored for other purposes. We saw a small brick and concrete building covered by undergrowth and took a look. I don’t know what its purpose was; I later found it on a 1950’s map when I did some internet searching, but I could not read the blurry print to find out what its function was. I liked the look of it so I took pictures.

We passed along Stony Creek – it runs through much of the park. The Stony Creek Anglers now run the fish hatchery.

We came upon this building. It appears on the 1950’s map I mentioned earlier, as being a stable. We took a look around.

The building and adjacent sheds appear to be used for nothing, really, although some picnic tables are stored in the shed. They look very out-of-place with the architecture and feeling of the buildings. Jarring, in fact.

Details of the stable building:

We saw this wagon back under the shed.

Well, we had to take a better look.

And a closer look at that set of gears.

 

I also liked the appearance of this door – it’s to a room in the shed.

I would have loved to have been able to see inside the stable. Maybe some other time it will be possible?

We got back on the road. We made our way to the finish of the 5K route, ending up at the pavilion area again.

I now feel I understand more about how the park is laid out, and I will be happy to come here and run on my own. I look forward to seeing how things look here later in the year.

 

 

I Continue to Practice Handwriting

You may remember my no-longer-secret ambition to improve my handwriting.

Here are a few recent samples – these from June:

and August:

I’ve got some thoughts on handwriting and what this quest has meant to me. But first, I’ll show you some of my tools.

I have learned a bit about pens and inks, enough to realize there is a whole world of handwriting that has been hidden from me until now. I now peruse pen and ink sites and read books on handwriting, not just how to do it, but also on the history of it. My tiny ambition has opened a whole new subject to me.

In my corner of the handwriting world, I have settled on medium nib fountain pens and rollerball pens as my favorites. Fine nibs and points scratch and drag at the paper for me. I like a nice thick flow of ink. Here is my current set of friends.

Top to bottom: Pilot V-ball 7 rollerball; Pilot Metropolitan fountain pen, medium; 2 different Lamy Safari fountain pens, both medium nib; a new pen I haven’t tried yet as I just received it in the mail today, the Pilot MultiBall rollerball medium; and the Platinum Preppy fountain pen medium.

I also am very fond of one of the cheapest pens around, too – Bic Cristal is my everyday go-to pen.

You may wonder about those pages of handwriting. I have developed a habit of practicing handwriting while watching television at night – I take notes on the show I am “watching” (when I’m not working a crossword puzzle or reading. You can see why I say “watching”.)

Anyway, I started the practice for…practice. But I have found handwriting to be a soothing meditative activity. I take my time and work to form the letters in a nice manner rather than in my hasty scrawl of the past. Writing has become a pleasant activity in of itself, not just something I have to do to get my thoughts on paper. I love seeing lines of nicely formed letters and words emerge and I love using a good pen full of quality ink.

Here is my ink filling station. I keep my inks on a shelf in the cabinet in the dining room.

And here are the ones I am using now. I can recommend all three of these inks. Beautiful colors and thick, intense color. That is what I like.

I am glad that at this later stage of life (I learned cursive handwriting in 1966) I can learn something new, I can improve a habit I was not happy with, and I can still stumble into an unknown world and find excitement in exploring it.

Handwriting is art to me now. I use it in my art, literally; I find inspirations in my handwriting practice for my poetry-writing; I enjoy the look of a nicely-written grocery list. I’m glad I took the step to try this handwriting thing out again.

People Wearing Clothes

On August 9 I visited downtown Philadelphia, in from the the suburbs. I took a lot of pictures and I’ve done several posts on my adventures – look back over the last few posts to get an idea of what I was up to.

My travels took me from west of City Hall all the way east to 5th Street on Market Street, the main east-west street in the city, and then I came back up on a parallel street, Walnut. Plus wandering around here and there as I went.

Today, I’m starting off looking east on Market from City Hall.

John Wanamaker Department Store, as it was when I came to Philadelphia in the late 1970’s, is to the right. It is now a Macy’s. I bought a sewing machine there in 1980 for $190. Just saying.

I also recall getting the nicest teal/tan plaid pleated Pendleton wool skirt there for a price I can’t bring to memory but I know was a steal, because I do remember that.

So you understand how I like to look in the store windows here. Always have. Right now they are displaying back to school fashions.

I also like photographing reflections, by the way.

Well, as I was heading on my way east, I saw a ghost.

If you follow my poetry blog, you may know that I published a couple of poems recently about seersucker suits. I have always liked the look of this kind of summer wear, but it’s not seen much anymore in today’s more casual fashions. Although in my early working days, seersucker was a  casual summer fashion.

Anyway, at about 12th and Market, I saw the ghost. Rather, I saw a man wearing a seersucker suit. And he was carrying a leather briefcase, also the kind of bag you don’t see as much of anymore. I did think I might have seen a ghost of 1980?

No, it was a real live person. I turned and followed him, digging out my camera as fast as I could. Here he is. I felt so happy.

Back On My Old Turf

On August 9, I took a little trip into Philadelphia; my husband had a meeting to go to and I got a ride in with him.

I walked all over Center City and the historical district; I’ve shown photo results of my day in the last few posts. Today I’ll talk about change and my life at work.

I am not originally from Philadelphia; I went to college in the area and then took a job with a local bank in 1980. Things were a lot different in those days, as you can imagine.

For instance, this building, a downtown mall, is being totally renovated. I remember it brand-new. I walked through the construction area on my way east on Market Street.

My destination was this location: 5th and Market Streets. I worked in this building, then known as the PNB Plaza, for many years. It looks exactly the same, except for the WF sign on top.

Next door, the National Constitution Center stands; it’s behind a construction fence – it is getting some kind of work done to it. In my era, this area was a giant paved plaza with a fountain that had some problems staying on the job.

Underneath it all (even today) is a parking garage; I zoomed in and out of there in my tiny car on my way to visit customers once a day, if not more often.

You may notice the tourists in the Plaza building picture. Many many tourists in this area – that is one thing that hasn’t changed!

Independence Hall is across the street and over a little.

In the past I was easily identified as a local, wearing my business clothes. Those tourists pictured earlier might have picked me out as a good person to ask for directions.

Today, I was just a late-middle aged lady wearing a sun hat. Oh dear.

Well, times change. I admit I was glad to see the Plaza building right where it ought to be, though.

On my way back uptown, I passed the hospital where my 2014 retina operation was done and my sight was saved. Thank you, Wills Eye Hospital, for giving me the ability to be out walking around today like this.

What Number, Please?

I took a little day trip into Philadelphia on August 9. I spent my time in Center City down to the historical area – from about 18th and Market to 5th and Market, and then over a block or two, and back up Walnut Street. A round trip of 3 or 4 miles.

On the way I took pictures of various sights. Now here is one that’s come up recently in my life: telephone booths.

I am of the age to remember and to have used pay phones. I remember when they still cost a dime. Enough said.

Pay phones are not too common these days. On east Market Street I saw one, though:

and I saw where one had been.

On my way, I stopped in the Curtis Center building to see the Dream Garden mosaic. I worked in a nearby building for some time and the mosaic was a favorite spot of mine to visit. And I remembered another landmark in my personal life. Past those stained glass windows, see that little alcove area with the stairs?

Here’s what is in there. The sign on the door says: Bell Telephone Pay Station.

Phone booths! I remember these two from way back when. They had a phone, phone book on a shelf, and a little wooden bench seat inside. You went in, closed the door, and it was…QUIET. I remember stopping in, not to call anybody, but to get a moment of QUIET.

I was puzzled, though, as to why the windows were so…white. My memory told me they should be dark; the booths had a light that went on when you closed the door, but it was not so bright as this was. On closer examination, I realized that the windows had white paper over them; through a tear, I saw that the booths no longer existed. The area behind had been torn out, enveloped into a larger space, and the whole thing immersed in mid-construction for offices.

Well, what do you know.

I’ll show you a quick look at another feature of this building, right around the corner from the phone booth remains. Curtis Center is actually built as a hollow square, with a huge atrium in the middle. I do not know what the space looked like when the building was put up in about 1914; I do know this format was used in the pre-air conditioning days as a way to get light and air into all the floors and all the areas of the building.

As a note, this building was the home of the Curtis magazine publishers, and all operations were done here, including the printing and binding. So, in summertime, air circulation would have been important.

The atrium now looks like this:

Nice, isn’t it? My husband tells me the building does a good business in hosting weddings and other events.

All right. More Philadelphia visit information later on!

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