Secret Ambition Handwriting Update – April 2, 2017

I’m working toward realizing a secret ambition: to have better handwriting. Read about the plan here to get some background…

I’ve been working on my penmanship for two weeks now. I’ve finished the exercises in the workbook – now I know all the print and cursive letters. It’s up to me to practice the new skills. I spend some time sitting at the table, writing, using good posture and so on. And I also have been putting in time while watching TV with exercises of my own devising. I have a pad of paper, a pen, and I watch (or mostly listen) to the TV show while jotting down bits of dialogue. I end up with pages that look like this:

You can actually read this text, even though it doesn’t make any sense.

I lose some in perfect letter formation but it fits my routine, and I’m ending up with a lot of interesting pages of surreal conversation. Could be some poetry inspiration there, I think…? Seriously, I figure I will be using my handwriting in all sorts of situations, not just ones where I can get set up in the proper writing mode. And, I just can’t sit and watch TV…

 

*************************************************************

I’ve gotten myself some fountain pens as a treat, and I’ve learned a few things.

1. I bought these two very nice pens, Pilot Metropolitans, they are, and well-recommended. They cost about $15 each and can use an ink cartridge or an ink  converter, which comes with each pen. The latter means I can use bottled inks.

I have one with a fine nib and the other one is a medium nib. I liked the way these pens wrote very much – the ink flow is reliable and not a blob or missed section of lettering. In the end, though, these pens don’t totally suit me. I find them top-heavy, even writing with the cap off, and the thicker shape is hard for me to grip. I also learned that Japanese-made pens feature smaller nibs (for instance, a medium in this pen is like a fine in other brands). The small nibs made for scratchy, less flowing writing, I thought.

But, I liked drawing with these pens a lot and I think they can be very good for when I might need small precise lettering.

2.
I then tried these other two pens. The first, the Platinum Preppy, costs $3, uses cartridges (you can also buy a converter), and comes in a lot of colors. I tried a medium nib. Loved it. The pen glides over the paper very easily. Plus, it’s light, and it is weighted more like the ballpoints I am used to, toward the tip. Easier for my hands to manage.

3.
I also bought a Lamy Safari, medium nib, plus its converter (separate) – the pen also uses cartridges. It cost about $35 altogether. Loved this pen, too. It zipped across the paper, no scratching, no skipping. A very soft feel, if I can describe it.

The Preppy is the clear one and the Lamy Safari is the black one.

 

4. Ink. Each pen came with a cartridge of ink, and I could use that, and replace it when I ran out with another cartridge. But…those inks in bottles! Now, I have learned that I could buy a lot of inks. So many colors!

But changing inks is not that easy – you need to clean your pen if you want to switch from black to blue, for instance. I contented myself for now with one bottle of black ink.

 

This is where the converter comes in. There are different types, and you have to make sure your converter matches your pen. And they do not always come with the pen – it’s a separate purchase. None of this is difficult, including using the converter instead of a cartridge. It is money-saving in the long run, and you get to have these beautiful bottles around, too. I have noticed that many inks come in lovely containers, which is not the point of improving penmanship, but is a nice little side benefit, right?

OK, I’m continuing to learn and practice. I have to say that I love doing this handwriting thing.  Who would have thought I would say that?

More later!

Secret Ambition Handwriting Update – March 25, 2017

I’m working toward realizing a secret ambition: to have better handwriting. Read about the plan here to get some background…

All right, a week has passed, and I’ve been working away in my handwriting workbook. I have progressed through the print alphabet and learned cursive letters; now I’m working on letter combinations and practicing writing sentences and paragraphs full of…words!

For this endeavor, my idea was to come up with handwriting that was legible and attractive-looking. I was tired of people asking me to decipher the very notes I was hoping to convey information through – meaning that I had to read to them what I had written. Could have just said it and saved time – right? I knew legibility would really mean something to me.

I also wanted my handwriting to portray the person I try to be, communications-wise and in life – organized, ordered, and in control of her thoughts.

I think I am making progress. My revised handwriting meets these goals so far. Looking very school-girlish and uncertain at times, yes – but I am a student again, so I welcome that. Let me show you a couple of samples.

Learning this new skill, I’ve realized some things I hadn’t expected. Here are a couple that strike me right now:

1. As I have been practicing, I’ve focused on each letter of the alphabet, how it’s shaped, how the sequence of curves and lines goes, in a way I never have done before. When I learned to write as a child, I was trying to learn what the alphabet meant as well as to write, and my attention was divided. Now, I pay attention to what I am doing with the benefit of just one focus. I KNOW these letters now and I am interested in taking the effort to make each one look well.

2. I have spent 50 years scrawling out words and letters and it never occurred to me to pay attention to the act of writing, just what I wanted to say. I sped along as fast as I could. Now I have to write slowly, thinking hard about each stroke. It is relaxing and satisfying to do this.

3. Each word is a challenge – the letters arrive in their order and I have to figure out how to manage them. There is more than one way to write each word. I am thinking hard about that as I write. Total focus.

OK, that brings you up to date. Maybe more later on. Thanks for reading.

My Secret Ambition

Time passes. And sometimes little dreams get lost in the shuffle of everyday living. For me, I’m going to reveal something I’ve felt for the last 50 years: I wish I had better handwriting.

Yes. That’s it. My secret ambition is to have nice handwriting.

I’ve always struggled with neatness, uniformity, and envy (of others’ ability to write a nice-looking set of words). In the 3rd grade (approximately 1967) I worked hard to learn cursive writing and ended up with C’s. This mark got me into trouble at home, and it bothered me, because I was working as hard as I could.

Well, decades passed and my handwriting has now come to look like this:

Notes I took about my husband’s care in preparation for his surgery after his accident, January, 2017.

Many times I have written out a check, scribbled a note, filled out a form – and thought how scrawly and awkward my words looked. I also had trouble writing something others could reliably read.

Not only did I want to write a nicer hand in everyday life – I also wanted to be able to handwrite the text for artist books I make and to put handwritten words into other artwork I do. Right now I type out words and glue them in, each time feeling it’s a second-best solution.

It hit me that I could do something about it. Plenty of people want better handwriting, I thought, and maybe the internet could help me out. After some research, I settled on the Getty-Dubay method, the brainchild of two teachers. I bought their book, Write Now. I printed out paper with the correct line spacing. I got a fountain pen to reward myself for taking on this challenge and to use when I had nicer letters for it to write.

I now can write, in printing, the lower-case letters.

I have just started. And I am quite excited. You know, this dream is not a big one, but a small one can be powerful nevertheless. I love the idea of being a person with nice handwriting.

I will keep you up to date!

noticed it

noticed it

noticed it

stood out sharp

stood out sharp

stood out sharp

ATC advice courtesy of the whims of chance and the random actions of the universe – or via Claudia McGill selections from her cut out word collection. You decide.

nothing is allowed

The oracle speaks. Was it speaking to you?

nothing is allowed

nothing is allowed

painting it red,

painting it red,

painting it red,

The ATC oracle speaks. Did it say anything to you?

in her dreams,

atc-in-her-dreams-6-16-small
in her dreams,
I present these oracle-like artist trading cards for your review and possible edification! You remember such items from the past, maybe – here they are again.
I make these cards and then I give them a phrase cut from printed matter, chosen at random but maybe not. See if you get any kind of push or insight or set off on any train of thought from looking at and reading these, even if it’s just to say, “Whaaat?!”

rain fell,

rain fell,

rain fell

I return to posting these oracle-like artist trading cards, for your review and possible edification! You remember such items from the past, maybe. Anyway, here are some more.

I make these cards and then I give them a phrase cut from printed matter, chosen at random but maybe not. See if you get any kind of push or insight or set off on any train of thought from looking and reading these, even if it’s just to say, “Whaaat?!”

scribbling

scribbling

scribbling

 

I present these oracle-like artist trading cards for your review and possible edification! You remember such items from the past, maybe – here they are again.

I make these cards and then I give them a phrase cut from printed matter, chosen at random but maybe not. See if you get any kind of push or insight or set off on any train of thought from looking and reading these, even if it’s just to say, “Whaaat?!”

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Archives

Categories

Pages